Difference between revisions of "Install SU and VI"

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The prerequisite for this is running SSH on your AppleTV. This assumes you haven't upgraded your SSH version (which you should: [[Install_SSH]]) and therefore can only connect using SSH v1.
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The prerequisites for these are running SSH on your AppleTV, and having access to an Intel Mac using universal binaries (except for su; see the note below). This assumes you haven't upgraded the SSH version on your AppleTV (which you should: [[Install_SSH]]) and therefore can only connect using SSH v1.
  
As I came from a Solaris and Linux background, two of the key commands I use when SSHing to a machine are
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==Installing su==
  
*su
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''Note: you don't need to install su to derive its functionality.  To obtain a root shell, simply type 'sudo bash' or 'sudo -s' and enter the password.  The prompt will change from a dollar sign (bash-2.05b$) to a hash (bash-2.05b#) to indicate the elevated privileges.''
*vi
 
  
 
su allows you to login as root ([http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?su]). Ordinarily, you'd need to know the root password. Try typing the following to see what I mean:
 
su allows you to login as root ([http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?su]). Ordinarily, you'd need to know the root password. Try typing the following to see what I mean:
  
su -
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<pre>su -</pre>
  
You get prompted for the root password....
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You are prompted for the root password....
  
 
On an OS X box, your administrator user has sudo rights to execute any command and therefore elevate your shell to be root:
 
On an OS X box, your administrator user has sudo rights to execute any command and therefore elevate your shell to be root:
  
sudo su -
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<pre>sudo su -</pre>
  
You get prompted for your password.
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You are prompted for your password.
 +
 
 +
==Installing vi==
  
 
vi is a line editor for making changes to files. On OS X, vim ([http://www.vim.org/docs.php]) is installed by default.
 
vi is a line editor for making changes to files. On OS X, vim ([http://www.vim.org/docs.php]) is installed by default.
  
To copy them to your AppleTV, first find them. They are both stored under /usr/bin. If you are using a graphical SSH client, you can drag and drop them to your AppleTV (you'll need to copy them to the frontrow user directory - /Users/frontrow). If you're using the command line:
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To copy them to your AppleTV, first find them. They are both stored under /usr/bin. If you are using a graphical SSH client, you can drag and drop them to your AppleTV (you'll need to copy them to the frontrow user directory - /Users/frontrow). From the command line:
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 +
<pre>scp -1 -r /usr/bin/su frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>:~/
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scp -1 -r /usr/bin/vim frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>:~/</pre>
 +
 
 +
Obviously replace <AppleTVIPAddress> with either the IP address or hostname of your AppleTV. The default hostname is 'appletv.local'.
  
scp -1 -r /usr/bin/su frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>
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The previous commands copied the files to your AppleTV; now you need to move them to their correct location.
scp -1 -r /usr/bin/vim frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>
 
  
Obviously replace <AppleTVIPAddress> with either the IP address or hostname of your AppleTV.
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First, ssh into your AppleTV:
  
That copied the files to your AppleTV, now we need to move them to their correct location.
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<pre>ssh -1 frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress></pre>
  
First, log into the AppleTV using ssh:
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When you copied su and vi over from your Mac, you may have inadvertently changed the owner and group of both. To check this:
  
ssh -1 frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>
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<pre>ls -al</pre>
  
Then move the files to the correct location:
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Now verify correct ownership of the files.
  
  sudo mv ~frontrow/su /usr/bin/su
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<pre>-r-sr-xr-x    1 frontrow  frontrow    44164 Jun 12 02:03 su
sudo mv ~frontrow/vim /usr/bin/vim
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-rwxr-xr-x    1 frontrow  frontrow 2060380 Jun 12 02:03 vim</pre>
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 +
If you see 'frontrow' listed where 'root' and 'wheel' should normally be listed, you will want to change the owner and group back to default permissions:
 +
 
 +
<pre>sudo -s
 +
chown root su
 +
chgrp wheel su
 +
chown root vim
 +
chgrp wheel vim</pre>
 +
 
 +
Another 'ls -al' should report this:
 +
 
 +
<pre>-r-sr-xr-x    1 root  wheel    44164 Jun 12 02:03 su
 +
-rwxr-xr-x    1 root  wheel  2060380 Jun 12 02:03 vim</pre>
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 +
You will now need to make the boot volume read-writable, if you have not done so already.
 +
 
 +
<pre>mount -uw /</pre>
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 +
Now move the files to the correct location:
 +
 
 +
<pre>mv su /usr/bin/su
 +
mv vim /usr/bin/vim</pre>
  
 
If you're used to executing vi rather than vim, create a symbolic link:
 
If you're used to executing vi rather than vim, create a symbolic link:
  
sudo ln -s /usr/bin/vim /usr/bin/vi
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<pre>ln -s /usr/bin/vim /usr/bin/vi</pre>
 +
 
 +
Note that this process can also be utilized to install nano on your AppleTV, if you prefer this text editor over vi.
 +
 
 +
[[Category:How-to|SU and VI]]

Latest revision as of 17:51, 31 October 2009

The prerequisites for these are running SSH on your AppleTV, and having access to an Intel Mac using universal binaries (except for su; see the note below). This assumes you haven't upgraded the SSH version on your AppleTV (which you should: Install_SSH) and therefore can only connect using SSH v1.

Installing su

Note: you don't need to install su to derive its functionality. To obtain a root shell, simply type 'sudo bash' or 'sudo -s' and enter the password. The prompt will change from a dollar sign (bash-2.05b$) to a hash (bash-2.05b#) to indicate the elevated privileges.

su allows you to login as root ([1]). Ordinarily, you'd need to know the root password. Try typing the following to see what I mean:

su -

You are prompted for the root password....

On an OS X box, your administrator user has sudo rights to execute any command and therefore elevate your shell to be root:

sudo su -

You are prompted for your password.

Installing vi

vi is a line editor for making changes to files. On OS X, vim ([2]) is installed by default.

To copy them to your AppleTV, first find them. They are both stored under /usr/bin. If you are using a graphical SSH client, you can drag and drop them to your AppleTV (you'll need to copy them to the frontrow user directory - /Users/frontrow). From the command line:

scp -1 -r /usr/bin/su frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>:~/
scp -1 -r /usr/bin/vim frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>:~/

Obviously replace <AppleTVIPAddress> with either the IP address or hostname of your AppleTV. The default hostname is 'appletv.local'.

The previous commands copied the files to your AppleTV; now you need to move them to their correct location.

First, ssh into your AppleTV:

ssh -1 frontrow@<AppleTVIPAddress>

When you copied su and vi over from your Mac, you may have inadvertently changed the owner and group of both. To check this:

ls -al

Now verify correct ownership of the files.

-r-sr-xr-x    1 frontrow  frontrow    44164 Jun 12 02:03 su
-rwxr-xr-x    1 frontrow  frontrow  2060380 Jun 12 02:03 vim

If you see 'frontrow' listed where 'root' and 'wheel' should normally be listed, you will want to change the owner and group back to default permissions:

sudo -s
chown root su
chgrp wheel su
chown root vim
chgrp wheel vim

Another 'ls -al' should report this:

-r-sr-xr-x    1 root  wheel    44164 Jun 12 02:03 su
 -rwxr-xr-x    1 root  wheel  2060380 Jun 12 02:03 vim

You will now need to make the boot volume read-writable, if you have not done so already.

mount -uw /

Now move the files to the correct location:

mv su /usr/bin/su
mv vim /usr/bin/vim

If you're used to executing vi rather than vim, create a symbolic link:

ln -s /usr/bin/vim /usr/bin/vi

Note that this process can also be utilized to install nano on your AppleTV, if you prefer this text editor over vi.